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Period Property Style  HEADING_TITLE

Please click on the links below for more information on period style

Gothic (c.1150 to 1550 and revived in the 19th century)

 Baronial Ceiling 12 Light - Iron Chandelier  Saxon Ceiling Light 2 Tier  Perth Ceiling 6 Light with Shades  Refectory Wall Light Twin Dual Electric/Candle

Lighting - tried to emulate the candlelight of authentic medieval ages. Look for huge metalwork chandeliers in black wrought iron and wall sconces in wrought iron and brass.

Georgian (1714 to 1837)

 Georgian Ceiling 5 Light  Georgian Ceiling 3 Light with Shades  Cameo Wall Light Twin - Light Bronze  Georgian Wall Light Single Polished Brass

Lighting - The arrival of paraffin was a major breakthrough for Georgian lighting. Look for chandeliers made from glass, metal and wood with curved arms like an octopus for a centrepiece. Elsewhere, use wall lights in brass, silver, or silvered wood or a simple candle flame bulb. Fittings in pewter or tin were used in less grand homes.

Victorian (1837 to 1901)
Lighting - Opt for brass, cast iron, pewter and tin light fittings. If you're hunting for original pieces, look for the lozenge-shaped mark topped with a crown that was stamped on most Victorian designs from 1842 to 1883.

Arts and crafts (c.1860 to 1910)
Lighting - plain wall sconces are best for lighting.

Art Nouveau (c.1880 to 1910)
Lighting - you've got to have a Tiffany lamp - the beautiful umbrella-shape rainbow of favrile glass with bronze and metal latticework. Original ones cost the earth but most of the high streets stores produce very good imitations.

Edwardian (1901 to 1910)
Lighting - electric lighting was just beginning to be introduced to the grander homes. Buy fabric lampshades in soft colours with frills and tassels. Use them on wall lights, table lights and even standard lamps. For a central light, look for a pendant fitting in smoked glass. Ceiling roses disguised the wiring for light fittings. Tiffany lamps or reclining female bronze figures are also in keeping.

1920s
Lighting - lights featuring female figures holding the ball of the lamp are typical and good reproductions abound. Also look for chrome, a brand new material at the time, and glass. Glass would have been etched, sandblasted or enamelled rather than coloured.

1930s
Lighting - lighting was mass-produced from industrial materials such as chrome, glass, opaque and frosted glass. For a modernist look, look for simple globe forms or simple tubes that can be arranged in groups like sculptures.
 

 

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